Sharing is Caring, Especially When It Comes to Cleaning

Fixing a Worn Oriental Area Rug

The world of rug repair and restoration is full of challenges, as different rugs age differently and come to our doorstep with a variety of issues. This unique oval circa 1940 Art Deco rug originates in China  and was designed with bubble gum color combinations. It is made of wool and has arrived to the Flat Rate Carpet warehouse along with an identical rug, looking like this:

The Rug - Before

The Worn Oriental Rug

The Mystery of the Small White Dots

In order to understand what these white dots are, let’s take a leap back. The time is around 1940 and the place is a rug weaving workshop, somewhere in not-yet-communist China. An expert weaver can spend months working on a single rug, tying together the lengths of yarn when the length they are using is at its end. In order to save time, most weavers would not trim the end of the knots closely, leaving small, white nubs that hide inside the thick rug. As years go by, the rug wears and gets thinner, sometimes by as much as half of its original thickness and the knots become visible, dotting the rug and damaging its beauty.

A Closer Look at the White Dots

A Closer Look at the White Dots

How to Turn Back Time

This is where we come into play. Every restoration and repair process begins with thorough cleaning: The rug was dusted and shampooed, regaining its softness cleanliness. Our wool restoration team worked on this rug in three stages. First, we trimmed the end of the knots close to the base of the rug, making it tighter and shorter so it doesn’t stick out. The second stage involved adding more wool to the rug, making it thicker and nicer and lastly, we colored it using natural vegetable dyes, restoring its original looks of the rug.

The Rug - After

The Rug – After

Get Your Rug Restored

This restoration operation is just a taste of the elaborate jobs we perform regularly at Flat Rate Carpet. This kind of job takes about 5 days it costs between $370 – $440.

For more information about our rug restoration and repair process and other services, call us at (866) 466-4576 or contact us using this form.

Decorating Your House With Area Rugs

There are many ways to prepare your home for the winter. We trade in tank tops for sweaters, and brink out warmer blankets, but what about the floor? No one wants to wake up in the morning and have their feet frozen! Keep your feet cozy and warm this winter with an area rug.

Area Rugs | Flat Rate Carpet BlogArea rugs range in variety from extravagant, antique oriental rugs, to simple and inexpensive. Adding an area rug into your home for the winter will make any room warm and cozy. Area rugs also add color to an otherwise plain room, and complete the look of a room.

Fine and oriental rugs are not only cozy additions, but are often so beautiful that they become the centerpiece of the room. In the colder months area rugs also help to insulate a room, keeping it warm and cozy for guests and residents.

Most of the time we see rugs displayed in the living room, but they make wonderful additions to other rooms as well. Often kitchen floors are tile, which is easy to clean but it very cold in the fall and winter. If your home is free of messy eaters a fine rug in the kitchen is pleasing to the eye and the foot.

Microfiber area rugs are now readily available. These soft, mat like rugs are easily washed in the machine at home, and are perfect for the kitchen. Get a few, smaller, microfiber rugs for areas of the kitchen where you prepare food and see what an amazing difference it makes. If you spill something on the rug just pop it in the wash!

Simpler, inexpensive rugs make lovely additions to kid’s rooms or playrooms. They are easier to clean than carpeting because they can be taken away and thoroughly cleaned by professional cleaners. Even if you have carpeting in the house, it’s a good idea to get an inexpensive area rug to protect the permanent carpeting from crayons, markers, playdough and other non carpet friendly toys.

Warm up your home with a lovely, winter area rug.

Is Your Rug Antique?

Antique  Rugs | Flat Rate Carpet BlogArea rugs fall into many different categories, most of which refer to where the rug was woven. A Persian rug comes from Iran, whereas an Oriental rug categorizes any rug from the East. No matter where in the world your rug was made, antique rugs are a special category.

Antique rugs are area rugs that were woven at least 80 years ago, and rugs woven at least 50 years ago are labeled as semi-antique. Most antiques are woven before the year 1925, when synthetic dyes were introduced into the rug industry. Synthetic dyes lack the richness and uniqueness of natural dyes, and are considered to be lower quality.

Antiques are hand woven, with all natural dyes, but that’s not all that makes them antique. Antique rugs aren’t just old, but they also have to fit into an undefined category of quality. The rug must be well preserved, and well designed.

If you think your area rug might be an antique, it’s worth taking it to get appraised. Antique rugs are very valuable, and must be cared for properly.

How to Weave a Rag Rug

Weaving is an ancient art form that is found in almost every culture around the world. Some groups of people weave so beautifully that their rugs and other woven pieces are considered fine artwork. Fine oriental and Navajo rugs are prized household items, however you can easily weave your own rug right at home.

Rag rugs are sturdy, home made rugs made from leftover t-shirts, bed sheets or other old fabric lying around the home. They make wonderful decorations for doorways, outdoors or even in the kitchen. In a society that’s used to tossing away old items, rag rugs are also the perfect way to reuse and recycle.

Here are links to two different websites with easy to understand tutorials about weaving your own rug:

http://www.wikihow.com/Weave-a-Rag-Rug
http://www.craftpassion.com/2010/03/recycle-tutorial-woven-rag-rug.html

It’s a fun and easy project that requires nothing more than old fabric, or a piece of cardboard. Making your own rug doesn’t take a long time, and leaves you with a sturdy woven rug for your home.

The Origins of Natural Dyes

Ever wonder where that beautiful red in your rug comes from? If your rug is colored with natural dyes then it could likely come from small insects called Cochineal or Kermes. Natural dyes are often used in hand area rugs because of their bright, lasting colors and the beautiful variation in colors that makes a rug unique.

Although rugs and other fabrics have been dyed brilliant colors for thousands of years, synthetic dyes have only been developed in the past 200 years. Before the 19th Century, almost all dyes were derived from plants, animals or minerals. Here’s a list of the most common sources for natural dyes.

Red – Cochineal and Kermes (insects), madder, redwood bark and Brazil wood (plants), cinnabar and lead oxide (mineral).

Orange – Henna (plant)

Yellow – saffron, safflower, tummeric weld and many other plant sources, ocher (mineral)

Green – a mix of blue and yellow dyes, or malachite (mineral)

Blue – Woad (plant), lapis lazuli and asurite (mineral)

Purple – Although purple can come from mixing red and blue dyes, the Royal Purple that is famous in royalty comes from the secretions of a sea snail. Since this purple is exceptionally rare and expensive it was saved for the highest classes.